Rabu, 03 April 2013

Air Pollution Linked to 1.2 Million Premature Deaths in China


Shanghai in January. Researchers said the toll from China’s pollution meant the loss of 25 million healthy years in 2010.


Air pollution was the fourth leading risk factor for deaths in China, accounting for the loss of 25 million healthy years of life from the population, a study said.

John J. Gumperz, Linguist of Cultural Interchange, Dies at 91


John J. Gumperz, right, crossing a river while doing fieldwork in India.


Professor Gumperz created a subfield, known as interactional sociolinguistics, that studies exchanges in a range of social situations, especially discourse across cultures.

A Prescription for Frustration



In two new books, doctors write about the problems, and details, of American medicine today.

Of Medical Giants, Accolades and Feet of Clay


A woman in Guatemala who had been purposefully infected with a venereal disease in the 1940s.


A debate is raging around a prize named after Dr. Thomas Parran Jr., who has been linked to unethical experiments, including the Tuskegee syphilis study.

Taking Ballet to New Heights


Life After Oil and Gas


NEWS ANALYSIS


Wind, water and sun could power the United States. But will they?

Existential Animal News and the World’s Lightest Solid


THE WEEK
In Indiana, a dairy farm is turning cow manure into fuel for its delivery fleet and milking equipment.


It was an up-and-down week for animals. On the plus side, cows are driving trucks and termites are making sand art, but bees have seen better days.

Staying H.I.V.-Free for $288



A new study suggests that most young gay men in Mexico City would pledge to stay H.I.V.-free, attend a monthly safe-sex talk and take regular H.I.V. tests for just $288 a year.

For Early Primates, a Night Filled With Color


OBSERVATORY


A genetic examination of tarsiers indicates that the saucer-eyed primates developed three-color vision when they were still nocturnal.

Distributed Denial of Service


AFTER THE FACT


It is easy to slow down Internet servers by harnessing thousands of computers to simultaneously send streams of data to a single address, but careful monitoring by Web services can protect against such attacks.

Through a Glass, Darkly


Q & A


Cataracts cannot grow back, but after surgery, patients may develop another condition that causes blurred vision.

Existential Animal News and the World’s Lightest Solid


THE WEEK
In Indiana, a dairy farm is turning cow manure into fuel for its delivery fleet and milking equipment.


It was an up-and-down week for animals. On the plus side, cows are driving trucks and termites are making sand art, but bees have seen better days.

Podcast: Science Times


Science Times


Marveling at the efficiency of a stone-cold killer in the skies and NASA’s household name on climate change takes his fight for the earth’s future into retirement.

(Not a) Model-Morphosis


T MAGAZINE
(Not a) Model-Morphosis


The photographer Greg Kessler captures the transformations of real women, with professional makeup by Tina Turnbow.

At Ease | Steven Alan Goes Home


T MAGAZINE


Easy living is about to get a little easier: the Steven Alan Home Shop opens today at 158 Franklin Street in TriBeCa.

Now Showing | The Abraham Archives


T MAGAZINE


In Antwerp, a closer look at the intricately printed textiles from the firm Abraham, which supplied the couture houses Dior, Givenchy and Balenciaga.

Now Booking | Hotel de Nell in Paris


T MAGAZINE
Inside La RĂ©galade Conservatoire, chef Bruno Doucet’s contemporary French bistro at HĂ´tel de Nell in Paris.


A forgotten corner of Paris’s Ninth Arrondissement is now home to one of the best big-city boutique hotels on the Continent.

Philip Crangi for JewelMint


T MAGAZINE
Philip Crangi for JewelMint


A new series by the web site JewelMint brings high-end designers to a lower price point.

Design in the Round



A selection of bowls from “Object Focus: The Bowl” at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Ore.

Better Than a Bachelor Pad



Turning a Venice Beach cottage into a house fit for a growing family.

Your Favorite Bowls


Multimedia

Consider the bowl, the most common of household objects. We asked readers to send images of their favorite bowls and tell us what makes them special.

Ready to Talk Amps and Ohms?


In a pinch: Champion Power 3,500/4,000-watt portable gasoline-powered generator, $425.


The best time to think about buying a generator is when there are no storms in sight.

Enter the Lighting Expert


ON LOCATION | LOS ANGELES
A bright orange staircase reinforces the industrial aesthetic of the Measers’ house and complements the soft blue sky in the Venice neighborhood.


How a house near Venice Beach kindled romance.

Finally, the Bowl Gets Its Due


THE DETAILS
“Untitled Yellow Crackle Bowl” by Glen Lukens (c. 1939)


The most commonplace of household objects stars in a new exhibition.

Vows: Vintage-Inspired Style



The wedding style guru Mark Ingram and the Styles reporter Bee-Shyuan Chang discuss the 1920s style wedding trend and offer ways to incorporate a little Daisy Buchanan into your wedding-day look.

Tony Visconti Will Lie for David Bowie


TALK
Tony Visconti


The producer talks about keeping “The Next Day” under wraps and doing drugs with John Lennon.

It’s a Natural Gas, Gas, Gas


THE ETHICIST


Weight loss; the Abbie Hoffman rule.

A Modest Proposal for More Back-Stabbing in Preschool


RIFF


Sure, I want my kid to learn how to share. I also want her to learn how to thrive.

A Brief Resurrection


LIVES


I thought I’d left the habit behind — until I ran into my ex-husband.

The Moral Instinct


From the Archive


Steven Pinker’s article from 2008 asks whether people know what to do with ethical impulses.

VIDEO: Spring Feast in the South



How to create a spring dinner party with friends — and not kill each other in the process.

INTERACTIVE FEATURE: Inside the Metropolitan’s Stage



Ahead of renovations, a look at the interior workings of the Metropolitan Opera.

The Man With the Wobbly Walk


DIAGNOSIS


Was the patient’s strange gait the key to his illness?

Send a Letter to the Editor



Letters should be addressed to Letters to the Editor, Magazine, The New York Times, 620 Eighth Avenue, 6th Floor, New York, N.Y., 10018. The e-mail address is: magazine@nytimes.com. All letters should include the writer's name, address and daytime telephone number. We are unable to acknowledge or return unpublished letters. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

Get Yer Yeah Yeah Yeahs Out


The Yeah Yeah Yeahs: Nick Zinner, Karen O and Brian Chase.


Karen O and her bandmates have never seemed comfortable as rock stars. Which has only made them that much more compelling.

That Other School Shooting


A makeshift memorial that appeared after seven people were killed by a gunman at Oikos University last April.


Seven people were killed at a nondescript nursing school in Oakland one year ago. Should it matter that the shooter was a Korean immigrant? It does to 

Is Giving the Secret to Getting Ahead?



The organizational psychologist Adam Grant argues that the key to hyperefficiency is tirelessly helping others.

The Growth (and Shrinking) of Juno Temple


THE ONE-PAGE MAGAZINE


Plus: The second annual Mehts celebration; Cyprus vs. Cypress Hill; a big, important chart of “Mad Men” characters.

Lean In, Dad

IT’S THE ECONOMY


In talking about women at work, let’s not forget the role of men at home.

Get Yer Yeah Yeah Yeahs Out



Karen O and her bandmates have never seemed comfortable as rock stars. Which has only made them that much more compelling.

A new wrinkle in online education



featured stories

A mighty wind


today's news


Thrusters powered by ionic wind may be an efficient alternative to conventional atmospheric propulsion technologies.

Official SAT Question of the Day™


Question of the day
Have a free SAT question emailed to you each day, and sharpen your skills one day at a time.

Official SAT Question of the Day™


Question of the day
Have a free SAT question emailed to you each day, and sharpen your skills one day at a time.

Financial Aid Can Help You Afford College


There's money out there to help you pay for college. And it's not too early to start learning how to find it. You can see how other students paid for college and learn the financial aid basics and steps to follow at BigFuture.

Get Ready


AP® Exams are coming up in May. Are you ready?
AP and Your Future
There are many paths you can take between now and your future. By giving you the opportunity to explore what interests you the most, AP courses help you find your unique direction.

Plan Your Summer Now


Colleges see meaningful summer activities as a demonstration of commitment and responsibility. Plus, it's always fun to get experience in doing something you like or learning about something new you enjoy.

Majors and Careers



One way students search for colleges is by looking at their anticipated major. But it's alright if you're not sure what major you want to pursue or what career it may lead to. There are many ways to explore majors and careers.

When to Take the SAT and SAT Subject Tests


Most students take the SAT during the spring of their junior year, and many choose to take it a second time in the fall of their senior year. In general, you should take SAT Subject Tests after you've completed the related course, or, for the language tests, after you've studied the language for at least two years. Check to see when the Subject Tests that you're interested in are offered.

Build Your College List


Now is a good time to find out which colleges really interest you. Your goal should be to have a solid college list created before the end of the school year. Then, you can explore them over the summer and enter senior year ready to tackle applications.

Do colleges look at PSAT/NMSQT® scores?


No, colleges do not use PSAT/NMSQT scores as a factor in the admission process.

The PSAT/NMSQT
provides practice for the SAT and an opportunity to be considered for the National Merit Scholars Corporation scholarship program. Score report feedback provides insight on your areas of strength and those that need improvement.

Dream Big, Act Bigger

April 2013  
Junior/Updatebrought to you by the CollegeBoard

In the spring, many students start thinking about life after high school. Going to college is often part of their vision.

If it's part of yours, remember: most colleges require you take standardized tests as part of the admission process. Now is a good time to take your first SAT® and to learn more about the SAT Subject Tests™ and how to prepare for them.